Vet Blog

Tips, advice and talking points

Gut stasis – the number one motility disorder of rabbits

20 August 2018

The rabbit gastrointestinal tract is an extremely intricate organ that processes and digests grass and vegetable matter with the help of intestinal bacteria. The normal movement of the gut is essential, and any individual with a reduced motility will be at risk.

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The ferret examination – check all 9

20 August 2018

Despite their reputation, most ferrets are easy to handle, and the risk of being bitten is no greater than from a cat. There are in reality just a few common medical problems seen in ferrets, so with some basic awareness and understanding of ferret behaviour, husbandry and health, it’s not difficult to examine and treat them in general practice.

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Small mammal nursing – 10 top tips

20 August 2018

Small mammals such as rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, rats and hamsters are all prey species, and as a result have evolved to hide away from predators and mask signs of illness and disease. By the time they are brought to see us, they can often be in an advanced stage of disease, possibly even in a critical condition. Emergency medicine and critical care techniques are therefore often required.

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Incisor malocclusion – surgical treatment options

31 July 2018

For many years, the traditional way to manage incisor overgrowth and malocclusion in pet rabbits has been to cut the affected teeth at frequent intervals. This has had the effect of allowing normal mastication and prehension of food to resume, but in most rabbits the procedure has had to be repeated every 4-6 weeks. It’s now recognised that this is no longer the most effective way to manage these cases, and if the teeth are ‘clipped’, will cause pain and risk fracturing the tooth.

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Incisor malocclusion – see our rabbit examination guide

31 July 2018

Unfortunately many owners are unaware of this problem until they see some of the more advanced signs such as a reduced appetite or dribbling saliva. Malocclusion of the teeth is usually easy to diagnose, especially if it affects the incisor teeth, and tends to be more common in small and dwarf breeds.

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Head tilt, circling and flipping in rabbits

31 July 2018

A sudden onset nystagmus, circling, head tilt or ’flipping’ is frequently seen in rabbits in veterinary practice. You’ll generally have a very distressed owner anxiously asking all sorts of questions, desperate to help their family pet and looking to you for help. In most cases, the problem will be neurological or vestibular in origin, and it’s your job to identify the cause. So what are the most common causes? Below we discuss 4 of the likely triggers.

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